Marvin Cahodas uses CLAS in Art History

Marvin Cohodas

Previously, I just uploaded the audio to the Connect site, but the CLAS function of allowing students to tag notes to specific spots in the audio is of great benefit.

–Marvin Cohodas, Professor of Art History and Visual Art


Marvin Cohodas, teaching Art History of Indigenous Latin America and other non-Western peoples, is one of the early users of CLAS.

I was excited to hear about the development of CLAS and have been using this system since it was made available.  Previously, I just uploaded the audio to the Connect site, but the CLAS function of allowing students to tag notes to specific spots in the audio is of great benefit.

I use CLAS to upload audio files of all of my classes, which involve Art History of Indigenous Latin American and other non-Western peoples.  Note that I use CLAS for audio only, rather than video recordings of class lectures, because the images are covered by copyright.  Recording audio also requires no special equipment as the same computer I use for presenting images and lectures also does the recording.

One benefit of CLAS is that it reinforces material, which is generally unfamiliar to students, full of terms of which most have never heard.  As these classes are in Art History, the images are the major part of the course, and students are always faced with the necessity of balancing note taking with looking.  CLAS takes the pressure off completely. Most students just jot down a few terms to orient their review and spend most of their time looking at the images. Then, when students review the audio recordings, they have an outline and can find the information they need rather quickly.

Actually, I can’t understand why all Art History courses don’t use the CLAS system to provide lecture back-up for students.

Dr. Marvin S. Cohodas, Professor in Art History, Visual Art and Theory